WHAT wealth INEQUALITY LOOKS LIKE IN OUR COMMUNITY

SPONSORED BY IN OUR NAME INITIATIVE

& MLK saratoga

TUESDAY, MARCH 27 – FREE
simple meal & coffee provided
6:30 TO 7 PM – RAP MUSIC BY AMANI OLUGBALA
7 TO 8:30 PM – PANEL PRESENTATION AND COMMUNITY CONVERSATION

“Conversations to Build An Inclusive Community” is a monthly discussion series in which our community’s brightest thinkers articulate their perspectives on important civic issues. The goal is to catalyze fresh thinking by merging our creative and intellectual powers to inform a conversation that is respectful, deep, empowering and unique.

The month of March is dedicated to discussing the effects of income inequality in our community.

Opening the night is spoken word artist and activist Amani Olugbala who weaves music, film, storytelling and poetry into performances that highlight social injustice, honor the ancestors, and lift the spirits of the marginalized. She promotes love, service and social awareness as a path to empathy, connection and positive change in local urban communities.

Our panel will get an open conversation started by sharing their insights and life experiences regarding income inequality and what that means to our local area. Panelists are:

Ron Deutsch, Executive Director, Fiscal Policy Institute (FPI)Ron has been a tireless advocate for working families for over 20 years in Albany. For 13 years he led the Statewide Emergency Network for Social and Economic Security (SENSES, a statewide anti-poverty advocacy organization) and has been the Director of FPI’s sister 501(c)(4) organization, New Yorkers for Fiscal Fairness, for the past 8 years. He also leads an all volunteer non-profit (www.thegivingcircle.org) that works to improve the lives of families regionally, nationally, and internationally.

Amani Olugbala –  Assistant Program Director, Soul Fire FarmAmani started out at Soul Fire Farm as a participant and later facilitator of the Black and Latino Farmers Immersion. Soul Fire Farm is committed to ending racism and injustice in the food system. They bring diverse communities together to share skills related to sustainable agriculture, natural building, spiritual activism, health and environmental justice. They are training the next generation of activist-farmers and strengthening the movements for food sovereignty and community self-determination.

Bonnie Nelson, Family Development & Getting Ahead Program Manager/Certified Bridges Out of Poverty Trainer, CAPTAIN Community Human Services. For 40 years, CAPTAIN has been providing programs that address core social challenges facing society, including homelessness, poverty, youth violence, underage drinking, drug use, academic failure, family dysfunction, and human trafficking. Bonnie Nelson has spent 20+ years helping people who are facing economic hardship to address urgent crises, find long-term solutions, and take a seat at the decision-making table. Nelson is particularly interested in the unique challenges of “hidden” rural and suburban poverty, and the struggle of under-resourced and working families.

Following opening remarks by the panelists, a facilitated discussion will ensue that will enable everyone in the room to share a personal experience, a question, an idea, or even a poem or song.

The curator and sponsor of this series is In Our Name Initiative, an organization dedicated to civic learning and legislative action for social, economic and criminal justice matters. In Our Name is a component of the Skidmore College Project on Restorative Justice, a national thought and training organization dedicated to the work of reconciling victims and offenders and finding more constructive ways to deal with crime and punishment.